See Ya Later 2019

New Year's Resolution

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Many of us enter the new year with plenty of goals and resolutions hoping to improve and change the way we live our lives. However, as the year progresses these New Year’s resolutions start to fade away slowly. Before we know it, we find ourselves going through our daily routine the same way as last year, without having made any real progress.

 

New Year’s resolutions are usually forgotten and never fulfilled, and people should stop waiting for the new year to begin and create a list full of false promises if they are not truly committed to them. 

 

More often than not, we tend to set up our New Year’s resolutions without a plan of action. Most people around the world have at least one of the following as part of their goals for the new year: lose weight, start a diet, or exercise more often. While these are good resolutions and can positively affect you if fulfilled, most people do not actually have a plan on how to achieve them. People do not really think ahead on how to do what they set out to accomplish, rendering their goals meaningless and forgotten. As the year comes to an end, people find themselves still eating out as much as they did the year before. 

 

Furthermore, some of the goals we set for ourselves at the beginning of each year are either unrealistic or overwhelming. People might find that exercising daily or eating healthy might be too difficult to keep up, especially when they are already overwhelmed with work or other activities. Reading more might be a challenge when you are stressing out over your grades or social life and there’s no room in your day for books. 

 

There are those who claim New Year’s is the best time for people to start all over again and become a better version of themselves. They use New Year’s Day as a way to motivate themselves to do better and get a job or driver’s license and to get rid of bad habits such as procrastinating or not sleeping enough. This is true to some extent, and students should set up goals and practice healthy habits. But while goals are a healthy way to inspire people, making a list of goals once at the beginning of each new year without giving them much thought and forgetting about them, later on, will help no one in the long run. 

 

If people truly want to grow and change their lives for the better, they should be able to create goals that are actually meaningful and in-depth at any time of the year and commit to them as soon as they are made. 

 

There is no reason why one should wait for New Year’s to start eating healthy, to start reading books, or to stop procrastinating. It doesn’t matter if it’s the middle of the week or the year. Life doesn’t magically reset every January 1st, so people should not wait for the new year for a fresh new start.